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Jonas Kaufmann

Monday, September 26, 2016


Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

September 16

Paris Opéra is shaken by ‘reckless spending’ audit

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped discA 10-year public audit of the Paris Opéra has exposed wild spending on taxis, luxuries and executive salaries. Ten executives (average salary: €160,000) managed to spend €93,349.38 in 2014 on taxis – and this, despite having a chauffeur driven car at their disposal (maybe that was for bringing croissants in the morning). The bosses also blew €52,413 on restaurants. Deputy director Jean-Philippe Thiellay spent €59,900 redecorating his office. Stéphane Lissner, the Opéra director, said most of the excesses exposed in the audit were before his time and he has acted swiftly to put a stop to them. Executive taxis, for instance, were down 30% this year, saving €59,900. (Almost enough to tart up someone else’s office.) Here’s the official statement: *La Cour des comptes a diffusé le 14 septembre un rapport sur la gestion de l’Opéra de Paris de 2005 à 2014. Ce rapport est positif sur de nombreux points, en particulier sur le développement des ressources propres et l’équilibre économique de l’établissement. Il relève avec pertinence plusieurs points délicats, notamment sur l’évolution de la masse salariale. La cour invite également l’établissement à la vigilance sur certains types de dépenses. La direction de l’Opéra de Paris, en poste depuis septembre 2014 souhaite insister sur les points suivants : Depuis le début de l’année 2016, il n’y a plus aucun véhicule de fonctions ; Le budget taxis a été réduit de -30% en 2015 par rapport à 2014. Il s’élève à environ 60 000 €, pour 17 dirigeants et un certain nombre d’artistes invités (accueil aux aéroports etc…) ; tous les déplacements sont retracés mensuellement, individuellement, avec le lieu de prise en charge, la destination et les horaires (ce qui est important notamment pour ceux qui travaillent la nuit dans nos deux théâtres) ; la Direction administrative et financière (DAF) et l’agence comptable veillent au respect des règles fixées dès mars 2015, puis par une délibération du Conseil d’administration du 18 décembre 2015 ; Les frais de représentation (déjeuners professionnels) ont baissé en 2015 par rapport à 2014 d’environ 10% : 47 000 € au total pour une vingtaine de personnes avec un budget individuel, pour la plupart, de quelques centaines d’euros de remboursements maximums par an ; aucune dépense ne sort de l’ordinaire (catégorie des restaurants, montant des factures…) ; la DAF et l’agence comptable vérifient l’identité des invités ainsi que le motif, non stéréotypé, du déjeuner ; Le 18 décembre 2015, le conseil d’administration a adopté à l’unanimité une délibération cadre fixant les règles pour toutes les dépenses des dirigeants ; l’Opéra a été volontaire pour participer au travail de réflexion et de proposition avec la Haute autorité pour la transparence de la vie publique (HATVP) sur la déontologie dans les établissements publics culturels (rapport de juillet 2016). UPDATE: Does Jonas Kaufmann get paid extra for rehearsal?

Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc

September 23

Breaking: Jonas Kaufmann cancels rest of the month

We have just been informed that the German tenor has pulled out of the Meistersinger revival in Munich (September 30, Oct. 3 and 8) and from a Budapest concert Sept. 25, dedicated to an idol of his, the Hungarian tenor József Simándy. Last week he cancelled the opening concerts of the Staatsoper in Berlin. Something must be seriously wrong. UPDATE: He will be repalced in Munich by Burkhard Fritz.






Tribuna musical

August 29

Mahler´s enormous Third Symphony crowns Israel Phil´s visit

Readers know already the magnificent results of the rentrée concert at the Colón of the Israel Philharmonic under Zubin Mehta. The same programme was repeated last Tuesday at La Plata´s Argentino with huge success. For that theatre it was a very special event, for they hadn´t received such a high-powered combination since 1923, when no less than Richard Strauss and the Vienna Philharmonic were there. I have partial information about a closed benefit concert presumably on Monday, which included a rare and difficult work: Schumann´s Concert Piece for four horns and orchestra. Apparently both conductor and orchestra are tireless, for in their second concert at the Colón for the Abono Verde (Green Subscription Series) they tackled no less than Gustav Mahler´s enormous (95 minutes) Third Symphony. Mehta brought along mezzosoprano Lioba Braun (debut) but the session was possible because the Colón contributed the women section of its Resident Choir (Fabián Martínez) and the Children Choir (César Bustamante). By the way, it is a curious circumstance that no less than four concerts of the Abono Verde happened in August, and two of them in consecutive days: Lang Lang and Jonas Kaufmann. And I have to mention that the best tickets were very costly, equivalent to about 300 dollars; the current economic situation makes such prices almost prohibitive, and even if they were famous artists, it showed in empty seats. And now to the Mahler Third. It was an audacious act by Gregor Fitelberg to première it in the early Thirties at the Colón, for the Mahler enthusiasm was forged in the Fifties worldwide thanks to the LP (long playing) record. My generation owes it to our great Mahlerian Pedro Calderón to have heard the whole lot, even the Tenth completed by Deryck Cooke. In 1973 Calderón and myself programmed the Buenos Aires Phil´s cycle, ad referendum of Artistic Director Antonio Pini; the conductor proposed to exhume the Third to launch the cycle, I agreed and Pini took the still audacious plunge: it was a complete success and the battle was won. Calderón repeated it in 2011 with the National Symphony and last year Rettig did it with the same orchestra. Franz-Paul Decker also conducted it in his almost complete cycle with the BA Phil. But no foreign orchestra ever ventured it here until now. And with all the undoubted merits of the previous occasions, we had the most radiant Third that BA has heard live. The Third was never recorded before the LP era: too long for the 78rpm times. Charles Adler had the privilege of the first recording in 1951, and after him, a cataract of 28 recordings up to 2000 (that´s as far as my RER catalogue goes) from most of the great conductors, including Mehta with the Los Angeles Philharmonic (1978). So all Mahlerian aficionados know it well by now, but its complexity leads to less frequent programming than others such Ns. 1, 4, 5 and 9. Mahler was a Summer composer; for the rest of the year he was one of the main conductors of his era. The continuous contact with orchestras allowed him to invent new textures, and in fact as an orchestrator his only rival was Richard Strauss. The period that goes from 1890 to 1910 is the last stretch of Postromanticism, gigantic and harmonically advanced. For Mahler, each symphony was a world, and in the Third his ambition was to reflect the world of Nature in seven movements; eventually he decided to postpone the seventh; he used it as the closing song of his Fourth Symphony. The first Movement is problematic due to its inordinate length (about 35 minutes) and loose construction, and –as all his symphonies- it includes a funeral march (he had a fixation with death). But that is contrasted with the very affirmative initial melody played by the massed horns; later two elements are essential: a solemn trombone solo and turbulently joyful music. Mehta followed scrupulously every instruction of the score; he doesn´t hurry the morose passages but knows how to grade the climaxes so that they seem the natural issue. In the impeccable playing two things are worth remarking: the clean unanimity of the horns and the admirable trombonist (Nir Erez). The lovely Second movement, Tempo di menuetto, in fact has plenty of variety in its rhythms and is supposed to portray the flowers. The phrasing and playing was simply exquisite. The Third is one of those inimitable Mahler scherzi of immense resource; its Trio is a long posthorn melody similar to the Carnival of Venice. I don´t think we heard a posthorn but the offstage trumpeter played pianissimo with the utmost delicacy and beauty. The Fourth incorporates the mezzo voice in a typical Nietzsche text, the slow and metaphysic "Night Song". The Fifth is the world of angels and bells; bim-bam sing the kids whilst the women give us "Three angels sang" (poem from "Des Knaben Wunderhorn") interrupted by the mezzo evoking Peter´s remorse and Christ´s pardon. Lioba Braun sang well though her timbre isn´t the most alluring, and both choirs did nicely. But it is the sublime last movement that stays in the memory, for it concerns the love of God. The music is slow, noble and moving , gradually coming to an intense final climax. Mehta was masterful and the orchestra responded with total concentration. A memorable end to a great experience. For Buenos Aires Herald

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